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20130801
20130831
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of his relationship with his wife, france, and parishioners in louisiana. this is about an hour. >> it is truly a pleasure to be with you. i cannot get a high enough or strong enough appreciation for the great turnout. thank you. you have been with me from the very beginning. if chammy great kindness. it would not -- but would not have to talk about it very much longer for me to tear up. thank you. thank you. i am every day amazed -- i am amazed at how many things that were lost have been replaced. and is intellectually people are stepping up to replace all of those little lost during this throughout my life. so thank you for that. thank you. give yourself a round of applause for that place. [applause] i am going to try to read rather quickly. if you have your bibles with you -- [laughter] i don't know if i have read in public without having to say that. so bear with me. you know anything about me, and he should know probably more than you want to if you have read the book, you know that i am not the world's best reader. probably the world's worst speller. i was the child sittin
relationship with his wife friend and parishioners into ridder louisiana. this is about an hour. >> it's a pleasure to be with you and i can't give a high enough or strong enough appreciation for the great turnout. thank you. you have been with me from the very beginning. you have shown me great kindness and i'll wouldn't have talked about it much longer for me to tear up so thank you. every day i am amazed, amazed at how many things that were lost and it seems like truly everyday people like yourselves are stepping up to replace all of those little lost trinkets throughout my life that i have collect did so thank you for that. so give yourselves a round of applause for that please. [applause] so i'm going to try to read rather quickly. you have your bibles with you. [laughter] i don't know if i have read in public without having to say that so bear with me. if you know anything about me and you should know probably more than you want to if you have read the book, you will know that i'm not the world's best reader and probably the world's worst speller. i was the child sitting in the t
there was a sort of forgot about. >> guest: it is shocking. what is interesting about the situation in louisiana and why just write about it is that there is a budget crisis. and this is something being experienced all across the country in the last five years. but with shrinking budgets, you know, one of the places is the public defenders office. so in new orleans what happened was they were forced to lay off one third of the lawyers. so one whole division, conflicts vision. it means if there are two people arrested for robbing a 7-eleven, one gets the public defenders office, but because they could be accusing each other, you need a separate lawyer. so when no new orleans they had a separate division and they completely got rid of that and the budget cuts. so anyone who came in with multiple arrests like that, they had no attorneys. so they were just sitting in jail for months and months and judges were making please. they were scrambling, threatening to let people out of jail without a trial because this was such a clear violation of their rights. it was a fiasco fischer. >> host: in the same
discombobulated. he had a sign announcing a restaurant and pub miles. his parents were from louisiana. he lived in the projects in san diego. during his two years in the army either missouri are the base and comenius certain places were off-limits to blacks and that many of his white comrades dismissed and simply because of the color of the skin. he felt his head jerked back snapping him back to the test at hand and the appendage would be a lousy outcome for many reasons to my including the damage it would surely do to his new 64 chevy malibu super sport with his wire rims front seat council. to his dismay the rest area was closed for construction, but it was later denied that he was dead tired. to keep going would be foolish. after surveying the scene and figuring out what was said he steered his super sport of the side of the construction site, turning up the engine and leaning back in a seat. the 44 caliber service revolver was within easy reach within the sheet and then fell fast asleep. he will have to buy the book to find out what happened to end. i did. in one of the perils of writing no
of louisiana. his parents migrated to america from india six months before he was born. he was typical of guests at the white house that night. the ostensible purpose of the evening was to honor the indian prime minister, the event also served as a barometer for how far and how fast an immigrant group had risen. in one generation indian americans had bolted from outsiders to will facets of american society. if from the google wanted to make small talk on the security line with the fortune 500 ceo he could tease jeff immelt who was born and bred -- if he wanted to bask in a reflective glow of a pea -- tp presenter did chat with the correct. hollywood was represented at the event. steven spielberg and the indian director of the $0.06 whose birthplace was in india were in attendance that night. as one of the pioneering indian success stories in the united states he knew all the indian entities and as the mackenzie legend in hot spots too. he had worked with many and served as a mentor to others. when the principal deputy solicitor general was in high school and getting pressure from his i
of them. he was from louisiana. he worked in the railroads for a while as a porter. when i met him, he was -- he had a water pump here and a little pecan tree, and he was cutting down the pecan tree to burn fire to keep himself warm. he was five-foot-five, sleeping on a little iron crate. the crate was too small for him, so he had a wooden beekeeper's box for his head. there were -- i'll looking inside, and there were veinna sausage cans, empty ones, that had had put in the corners to keep the place from falling. literally, chickens have a better roost than had did, and this is where he was living. he came, you know, we found him a half century later, and he was nervous, thought we were government workers here to maybe inspect the house, shut it down, whatever. i said, new york city we're -- i said, no, we're here to tell his story. we're standing in the old lake basin. it was the biggest body of fresh water west of the mississippi, 800 square miles of lake right here in the middle of california, and these cotton grower from the south, chased out by the bull weevil came west, and they
of them. he was from louisiana. he worked in a row boats for a while porter. when i met him, he had a little water pump year and a little pecan tree and he was cutting down the pecan tree to burn fire to keep himself warm. he was five-foot five site.iron crate. the iron crate was too small, so he had to beekeepers box for his head. i remember looking inside and there were vienna sausage cans, empty ones that he put in the credit saves to keep the place from falling. chickens have a better roost than he did. this is where he was living. we found and a half a century later and he was paribas. he thought we were government workers here to maybe inspect the house, shut it down, whatever. i told them no, we were here to tell his story. standing in the old to the relay could be said was the biggest body of freshwater west of the mississippi, 800 square miles right here in the middle of california. these cotton growers from the south were chased out by the bull weasel, came last and they claim this land, this blakely and. they took the rivers and dams them and shoved to the flow to places
louisiana is cut away. you can't get there anymore. so all their supplies, all the food and all the manpower is coming from the mississippi through the confederacy coming eastbound. it doesn't happen anymore. they can't cross the river. big union controls the river. the other thing is vicksburg is a rail hub. the railroad coming from the east stops at the river in vicksburg and from there it points west -- from points west that stops. now the union army controls the railroad and they cut it off. you can't underestimate the power of rivers and roberts during the civil war. they didn't have interstate highways. they didn't have trucks. these rivers and railroads and the union army by capturing vicksburg stops all of that and the whole part of the country. the other part of this is now the mississippi river is wide open for the union army to use and the union navy to use to transport material meant food equipment, so whatever they need and to the south trade it very definitely is the beginning to the end for the confederacy and a lot of people in the confederacy know this. that is the history l
they are alive. the most terrible mine it was made in louisiana, exporter of the world, used all over the place, different countries. in a sense of these struggles will always return to where you are if you are interested in them. so what is the point of saying somebody joining the antitear gas movement? tear gas is extensively used. they would join the movement to end the revolution to ban teargassed. that is the legitimate international policy. but the politics you're thinking of that your guess is needed america, brazil -- i read the reports. it's in a handful of places and those are the places they have to assert themselves but that doesn't mean they are going to stop manufacturing teargas in the opportunity to the americans have band it and at the same time there has to be a cushion the global forum to have an international convention against teargassed here's the thing, there are conventions against most of these things. one has to fight -- i'm going to say this, it sounds idiotic but forgive me, we have to fight for the right of the international law and the importance of the internation
, whereas a mine will just kill ten people. that mine was made in louisiana, exported around the world, used in afghanistan, used all other the place, sold to different countries. in a sense, these struggles will always return to where you are if you are interested in them. see, what is the point of, say, somebody in mongolia joining anti-tear gas movement unless tear gas is extensively used in mongolia? that's how they are use -- join the movement to end tear gas use. let's have a u.n. resolution to ban tear gas. that is a legitimate international politics. but the politics that you're thinking of is that tear gas is made in the u.s., in brazil. what is it, five, six places? i read that report. basically, a handful of places. those are the places where the campaign has to assert itself. but that doesn't mean that tomorrow the indians are going to stop manufacturing tear gas. the americans have banned it, the brazilians have banned it. at the same time, there has to be a push in the global forum to have an international convention against tear gas. but here's the thing, there are internation
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10